Magnetic Therapy Posts

Cupping with Q Magnet Application Case Study

Cupping is applied by suction within a “cup” on the surface of the skin. An after effect is the stagnation of blood, which can persist for a few weeks after treatment. The application of Q magnets over haematomas has been shown to leave a white circle underneath where the magnet is applied only in a matter of days. Numerous examples have been documented such as these four…

Recovery for minor sprains and strains so you can get back to your favourite sport sooner…

 

Are the Dinosaurs of Medicine the Innovators or the Sceptics?

In 2013, Steven Salzberg declared Battlefield Acupuncture the worst quackery for 2011. Follow this link for…his explanation.

Battlefield Acupuncture was pioneered by Dr Richard Niemtzow and is administered at the point of injury to provide comfort and pain relief to wounded soldiers. Salzberg uses pejoratives such as pseudoscience, nonsense and unscientific to label acupuncture, as well as other complimentary therapies such as magnetic field therapy.

 

Astroturfing and its relevance to agendas behind magnetic field therapy

The content of this TEDx talk is impressive. Sharyl Attkisson, an authentic investigative journalist explains the concept of astroturfing, how vested interests skew agendas.

Powerful companies and movements engage in astroturfing to fool you that there is widespread support for or against an agenda, when there really isn’t. They manipulate you into thinking you’re weird or gullible, when you’re not.

 

Static magnets providing hope for post-polio syndrome pain sufferers.

While polio may have been eliminated in the industrialised world, there are still thousands of post-polio sufferers living with the after effects of chronic pain. Polio Australia has been established specifically for post-polio survivors and is an excellent resource.

 

DISCLAIMER:
The type of magnet used is this study is not a Q magnet.
The safety and effectiveness of Q magnets has not been established in the treatment of post-polio pain.

Ridiculous arguments against magnetic field therapy deserve comical responses (II)…

This is the second drawing in our comical response series…

Some of the arguments put forward by skeptics against magnetic therapy are so hilarious, we’ve come up with a few comical responses of our own. How many times do you hear people say magnets are too weak or they don’t penetrate deep enough to do anything. It’s like someone saying why would you want to carry a brick mobile phone with you, they’re too heavy and all you can do is make a call.
(Drawing by our 16 year old daughter Melissa)

 

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