Magnetic Therapy Posts

How even good articles make misleading claims about magnetic therapy

 

Media articles that cover magnetic therapy, almost without exception ignore, or in some cases ridicule the idea that static magnets can relieve pain. Articles such as Magnets’ pull yet to be proven, demonstrate this so well.

 

A very good article; You won’t believe how magnets are changing medicine  in My Body & Soul explains some of the exciting areas where magnets are being used in medicine.

Magnetic Fields used in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

SUMMARY:

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) passes an unimpeded magnetic field through the scalp and skull.
  2. The action on the brain is caused by electromagnetic induction, which is basically creating electrical activity within a very specific part of the brain through a changing magnetic field.
  3. The magnetic field has been optimised for the therapy and the dose given to a precise part of the brain.
  4. This article will also discuss tSMS or Transcranial Static Magnetic Field Stimulation.
  5. Research has found it to be as effective as anti-depressants and that’s even with patients who did not respond to anti-depressant medication.

 

Transcranial, meaning through the cranium (or skull) with magnetic fields into the brain, is where the term Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is derived. Sometimes known as repetitive rTMS, it directs strong magnetic field pulses into specific parts of the brain to stimulate a response. For instance, the prefrontal cortex is a target to treat depression. The magnetic treatment has been approved in many countries such as the United States for the treatment of medication resistant depression. However in countries such as Australia, it has yet to receive access to Medicare funding. TMS is an emerging field with many therapeutic applications and a growing list of conditions such as anxiety, PTSD and OCD.

The irrational and remarkable bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets

 

The bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets in society is as irrational as it is remarkable.

An article titled – “What are the best methods to help reduce knee pain” was published in The Australian on September 28, 2018 and was republished from the The Times of UK. The author, Peta Bee claimed that magnets “work by increasing the circulation of iron in the blood”. This description is comical and is completely contradicted by published research.

Twice we attempted to post a comment, not our words, but quoting a published Harvard Medical School clinical trial using static magnets for knee pain and twice the comment post was denied publication. You could call this a classic example of astroturfing, where vested interests promote agendas.

What we can learn from a doctor’s 1880 article on the therapeutic use of magnets.

Summary of what we can learn… 

  1. The stigma from people promoting magnetic therapy products was already well established by 1880.
  2. Simple treatments can avoid the risk and side-effects of more toxic therapies.
  3. The concept of improving the magnetic apparatus used, what we refer to today as the optimisation process was already being contemplated.

 

In 1880, an article published in the Scientific American Supplement, by retired US Army Surgeon-General William Hammond M.D. stated…

Cupping with Q Magnet Application Case Study

Cupping is applied by suction within a “cup” on the surface of the skin. An after effect is the stagnation of blood, which can persist for a few weeks after treatment. The application of Q magnets over haematomas has been shown to leave a white circle underneath where the magnet is applied only in a matter of days. Numerous examples have been documented such as these four…

Recovery for minor sprains and strains so you can get back to your favourite sport sooner…

 

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