Sceptics Posts

The Mesmer Hangover – a major source of stigma for magnetic therapy… since 1784!

Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815).

What would you say if I were to suggest that the unconventional practices of an Austrian physician from the late eighteenth century were a major contributor to an erroneous stigma on magnetic therapy, even to this day? You might think that’s doubtful, but wait until you learn of this extraordinary tale.

No doubt you have heard of the word mesmerize, but you may not be familiar with the originator of the term, a Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815). This is the incredible tale of a therapy he founded called Animal Magnetism. A therapy that exists to this day under the name Mesmerism. The history of medicine is full of strange claims and miraculous cures, but Mesmerism is still discussed over 200 years later and has now passed into the dictionary. In this article we go back to the source documents to discover what mesmerism is and how it became conflated with magnetic therapy.

The irrational and remarkable bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets

 

The bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets in society is as irrational as it is remarkable.

An article titled – “What are the best methods to help reduce knee pain” was published in The Australian on September 28, 2018 as republished from the The Times of UK. The author, Peta Bee claimed that magnets “work by increasing the circulation of iron in the blood”. This description is comical and completely contradicted by published research as explained in this article on debunking myths around magnetic therapy and blood flow. The published clinical trial used to justify the author’s rediculous comments was a 2009 paper using magnetic and copper bracelets; see references below.

Twice we attempted to post a comment, not our words, but quoting a published Harvard Medical School clinical trial using static magnets for knee pain and twice the comment post was denied publication. You could call this a classic example of astroturfing, where vested interests promote agendas.

Are the Dinosaurs of Medicine the Innovators or the Sceptics?

In 2013, Steven Salzberg declared Battlefield Acupuncture the worst quackery for 2011. Follow this link for…his explanation.

Battlefield Acupuncture was pioneered by Dr Richard Niemtzow and is administered at the point of injury to provide comfort and pain relief to wounded soldiers. Salzberg uses pejoratives such as pseudoscience, nonsense and unscientific to label acupuncture, as well as other complimentary therapies such as magnetic field therapy.

 

Ridiculous arguments against magnetic field therapy deserve comical responses…

Some of the arguments put forward by skeptics against magnetic therapy are so hilarious, we’ve come up with a comical responses of our own…
(Drawing by our 15 year old daughter Melissa)

Not All Magnets Are Created Equal

Not All Magnets Are Created Equal

 

Response to RACQ magazine “The Road Ahead” article on magnetic therapy.

An article on magnetic therapy titled “Magnets’ pull yet to be proven” appeared in the Oct/Nov, 2014 issue of the popular RACQ magazine, The Road Ahead.

The RACQ is also a large insurer for motor vehicle injuries and ironically we have had a role in rehabilitating many of their policy holders for conditions such as whip lash using Q Magnets. The author of the article is prominent Australian sceptic Loretta Marron OAM. Click on the image to enlarge it and read the entire article. Here is our response below…

RACQ-2014-Magnets-Pull-Yet-To-Be-Proven

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