Research Posts

Magnetophobia – an irrational belief

Magnetophobia is the irrational belief that static magnetic fields produce no physiological effects or have no therapeutic benefits. The colourful history of magnetic field therapy contributes to this belief and is sustained by misinformation and the complexity of the subject matter.

When you have an understanding of Mesmerism and the history of magnetic therapy, you can appreciate why such an irrational belief exists.

But there are good reasons why magnetic field therapy is a new frontier in medical research, providing valuable health benefits.

The Mesmer Hangover – a major source of stigma for magnetic therapy… since 1784!

Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815).

What would you say if I were to suggest that the unconventional practices of an Austrian physician from the late eighteenth century were a major contributor to an erroneous stigma on magnetic therapy, even to this day? You might think that’s doubtful, but wait until you learn of this extraordinary tale.

No doubt you have heard of the word mesmerize, but you may not be familiar with the originator of the term, a Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815). This is the incredible tale of a therapy he founded called Animal Magnetism. A therapy that exists to this day under the name Mesmerism. The history of medicine is full of strange claims and miraculous cures, but Mesmerism is still discussed over 200 years later and has now passed into the dictionary. In this article we go back to the source documents to discover what mesmerism is and how it became conflated with magnetic therapy.

Discovery of fibromyalgia biomarker offers hope of earlier diagnosis for sufferers


Fibromyalgia literally means ‘fibrous muscle tissue pain’, which is a pretty accurate description of the condition.

Also referred to as ‘Fibromyalgia Syndrome’, or by the abbreviations ‘FM’ or ‘FMS’, sufferers experience the following symptoms…

 

Is current pain medication targeting just the initial pain? One research team thinks so.

taking a pillLast month a research team at the Harvard Medical School led by Professor Qiufu Ma found that testing of pain medications may have been targeting their effectiveness against only one type of pain – the initial pain reaction – rather than the ongoing pain that continues after an injury.

Taking the example of touching a hot stove, the natural and automatic reaction is to pull the hand away quickly, and to tend to the pain by for example rubbing or sucking the affected area.

There is an initial burst of pain which prompts this reaction, but the sustained ache has a different effect – one of encouraging the person to protect the site of the injury.

What we can learn from a doctor’s 1880 article on the therapeutic use of magnets.

Summary of what we can learn… 

  1. The stigma from people promoting magnetic therapy products was already well established by 1880.
  2. Simple treatments can avoid the risk and side-effects of more toxic therapies.
  3. The concept of improving the magnetic apparatus used, what we refer to today as the optimisation process was already being contemplated.

 

In 1880, an article published in the Scientific American Supplement, by retired US Army Surgeon-General William Hammond M.D. stated…

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