New Research Posts

Magnetic Revolution: Why magnetism is a new frontier in medical research.

 

The use of magnetic fields is fast developing into a most promising area of medical research. Magnetism is cutting edge in the areas of cardiology (remote magnetic navigation, spatially targeted therapeutics), surgery (reflux management system), oncology (magnetic induction hyperthermia), psychiatry (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or TMS),  radiology (MRI), pathology (magneto-optic screening) and emerging areas of pain therapy (magneto-neuromodulation), while the use of medical magnets in pain management is gaining credibility amongst medical practitioners.

The principle reason for this magnetic revolution in medicine is science. That is, by testing, validating and refining the optimisation process. Innovation produces more effective technologies and their commercialisation improves the lives of patients. Magnetism in medicine has the added advantage of its non-invasive nature with few side-effects and relatively low-cost. Unfortunately, most people’s concept of magnetic therapy is bipolar magnets in underlays and magnetic jewellery, however these are just a diversion to the real innovation.

Good Medicine program investigates research on Quadrapolar magnets.

Cochrane Review Supports the Use of Electromagnetic Field Therapy

DISCLAIMER:
The type of magnets evaluated in this review are electromagnetic fields (generated by electricity) and not static magnetic fields as Q Magnets are defined.

 

The Cochrane Collaboration published an important review in October 2013 called “Electromagnetic fields for treating osteoarthritis (Review)”.

Magnetic Fields and Laser Combining Once Again to Improve People’s Lives…

 

In a previous post, we debunked the myths around magnetic therapy and blood flow and explained why iron (Fe) in the blood in not attracted to a magnet field.

The scientific principles around iron in haemoglobin have now made it possible to simply detect the malaria parasite using a combination of magnetic fields and laser light. Many clinics use LLLT (Low Level Laser Therapy) in the treatment of pain which can be very effective and possibly improved by using Q Magnets in conjunction as a “take home” therapy. So it’s great news to see magnetic fields and laser combine once again, this time as a diagnostic tool.

As you know, haemoglobin in red blood cells contains iron and is the carrier used to transport life giving oxygen around the body. The malaria parasite digests haemoglobin as a food source, but the isolated heme component which contains the iron is toxic. So the parasite cleverly converts the heme into an insoluble rod like crystal called hemozoin.

Application of magnetic fields in medicine is expanding and reducing the need for surgery in children…

Static Magnetic Fields May Have an Anti-inflammatory Effect at The Cellular Level.

 

This in-vitro (cell study) experiment demonstrated convincing evidence that exposure to a strong, inhomogeneous static magnetic field (iSMF) for up to 24 hrs has a significant inhibitory effect on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α from macrophages as compared to negative, untreated control. There is also evidence that low-dose naloxone with morphine has a similar effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (Lin, et al. 2010).  This suggests that the action of iSMF-exposure may be similar to that of serum morphine.

 

Concentration of Interleuken-6 released from macrophages

Concentration of Interleuken-6 released from macrophages

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