New Research Posts

Discovery of fibromyalgia biomarker offers hope of earlier diagnosis for sufferers


Fibromyalgia literally means ‘fibrous muscle tissue pain’, which is a pretty accurate description of the condition.

Also referred to as ‘Fibromyalgia Syndrome’, or by the abbreviations ‘FM’ or ‘FMS’, sufferers experience the following symptoms…

 

Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries on the rise globally

footballer painIn the US around 100,000-200,000 Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ruptures occur every year, although since these figures are provided by colleges and high schools in the US, they do not include injuries outside formalised sport and so the actual number may be even higher.

Here in Australia there has been a steep rise in ACL injuries over the past 15 years – a 70% hike, with a disproportionate number of these occurring in children under the age of 14.

You might think that ACL injury is more common in contact sports and caused by contact, but in fact most (~70%) occur in non-contact situations, when jumping or turning sharply. Sports that have higher rates of ACL injury include soccer, basketball, volleyball and skiing.

People’s sensitivity to magnetic fields could differ, new research shows

compassWe’ve known for some time that different people have different sensitivities to static magnetic fields.

There doesn’t appear to be an obvious reason as to who, why or where, but as a health practitioner, you place magnets on enough patients and the differences in sensitivity are obvious.

 

Clinical trial shows magnets provide pain relief from myofascial trigger points

The Physical Therapy department at Armstrong Atlantic State University conducted a Randomised Clinical Trial using static magnets on myofascial trigger point pain. The 2004 study was part of the student capstone project and supervised by professors of the physical therapy department. Although the study wasn’t published, the results were presented at the Bioelectromagnetics Society annual meeting.

 

A 1997 clinical trial by Vallbona, showed a significant benefit to patients suffering post-polio pain using a flexible rubber magnet with concentric rings in alternating poles. The study at Armstrong involved 30 patients and tested the same magnets as the Vallbona study, but on a more general population.

Magnetic fields used in transcranial magnetic stimulation

SUMMARY:

  1. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) passes an unimpeded magnetic field through the scalp and skull.
  2. The action on the brain is caused by electromagnetic induction, which is basically creating electrical activity within a very specific part of the brain through a changing magnetic field.
  3. The magnetic field has been optimised for the therapy and the dose given to a precise part of the brain.
  4. This article will also discuss tSMS or Transcranial Static Magnetic Field Stimulation.
  5. Research has found it to be as effective as anti-depressants and that’s even with patients who did not respond to anti-depressant medication.

 

Transcranial, meaning through the cranium (or skull) with magnetic fields into the brain, is where the term Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is derived. Sometimes known as repetitive rTMS, it directs strong magnetic field pulses into specific parts of the brain to stimulate a response. For instance, the prefrontal cortex is a target to treat depression. The magnetic treatment has been approved in many countries such as the United States for the treatment of medication resistant depression. However in countries such as Australia, it has yet to receive access to Medicare funding. TMS is an emerging field with many therapeutic applications and a growing list of conditions such as anxiety, PTSD and OCD.

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