The irrational and remarkable bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets

 

The bias against the therapeutic use of static magnets in society is as irrational as it is remarkable.

An article titled – “What are the best methods to help reduce knee pain” was published in The Australian on September 28, 2018 and was republished from the The Times of UK. The author, Peta Bee claimed that magnets “work by increasing the circulation of iron in the blood”. This description is comical and is completely contradicted by published research.

Twice we attempted to post a comment, not our words, but quoting a published Harvard Medical School clinical trial using static magnets for knee pain and twice the comment post was denied publication. You could call this a classic example of astroturfing, where vested interests promote agendas.

What we can learn from a doctor’s 1880 article on the therapeutic use of magnets.

Summary of what we can learn… 

  1. The stigma from people promoting magnetic therapy products was already well established by 1880.
  2. Simple treatments can avoid the risk and side-effects of more toxic therapies.
  3. The concept of improving the magnetic apparatus used, what we refer to today as the optimisation process was already being contemplated.

 

In 1880, an article published in the Scientific American Supplement, by retired US Army Surgeon-General William Hammond M.D. stated…

Attaching Q magnets using braces, supports and wraps

Q magnets are often attached with sports tape, but some people with sensitive or hairy skin or just for convenience sake, may prefer a type of brace.

 

Magnet placement for carpal tunnel syndrome

Magnet attached with sports tape for carpal tunnel syndrome.

Cupping with Q Magnet Application Case Study

Cupping is applied by suction within a “cup” on the surface of the skin. An after effect is the stagnation of blood, which can persist for a few weeks after treatment. The application of Q magnets over haematomas has been shown to leave a white circle underneath where the magnet is applied only in a matter of days. Numerous examples have been documented such as these four…

Recovery for minor sprains and strains so you can get back to your favourite sport sooner…

 

Are the Dinosaurs of Medicine the Innovators or the Sceptics?

In 2013, Steven Salzberg declared Battlefield Acupuncture the worst quackery for 2011. Follow this link for…his explanation.

Battlefield Acupuncture was pioneered by Dr Richard Niemtzow and is administered at the point of injury to provide comfort and pain relief to wounded soldiers. Salzberg uses pejoratives such as pseudoscience, nonsense and unscientific to label acupuncture, as well as other complimentary therapies such as magnetic field therapy.

 

Warnings:

css.php
ERROR: 1 - [InvalidConfig]Invalid Configuration: for help setting up your API, please contact Support ( ext. 2)