Magnetic Therapy Posts

Magnetic Revolution: Why magnetism is a new frontier in medical research.

 

The use of magnetic fields is fast developing into a most promising area of medical research. Magnetism is cutting edge in the areas of cardiology (remote magnetic navigation, spatially targeted therapeutics), surgery (reflux management system), oncology (magnetic induction hyperthermia), psychiatry (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or TMS),  radiology (MRI) and pathology (magneto-optic screening), while the use of medical magnets in pain management is gaining credibility amongst medical practitioners.

The principle reason for this magnetic revolution in medicine is science. That is, by testing, validating and refining the optimisation process. Innovation produces more effective technologies and their commercialisation improves the lives of patients. Magnetism in medicine has the added advantage of its non-invasive nature with few side-effects and relatively low-cost. Unfortunately, most people’s concept of magnetic therapy is bipolar magnets in underlays and magnetic jewellery, however these are just a diversion to the real innovation.

Good Medicine program investigates research on Quadrapolar magnets.

Magnetism in medicine will be the solution to many shortfalls in medical research…

Probably the most comprehensive text on magnetism in medicine written to date.

In conclusion, the elegance, noninvasive nature and other advantages of magnetic procedures in medicine – combined with the need to solve many current research problems – will ensure that this highly technological field retains its dynamic state over the years to come. Jens Haueisen

Magnetism in Medicine: A Handbook. By Wiley-VCH

Magnetism in Medicine: A Handbook. By Wiley-VCH

Andra, W. and H. Nowak (2007). Magnetism in Medicine: A Handbook. , Wiley-VCH.

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) does not appear to be helped by static magnetic field therapy, but probably by PEMF…

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is something very familiar to athletes or anyone embarking on a fitness campaign unaccustomed to strenuous exercise. There have been two studies looking at the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) therapy on DOMS and three with pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). Looking at this research provides a valuable lesson in how varying the type of field and strength and duration of treatment will determine whether or not there is a benefit to the patient.

The first study by Reeser (See REF 1 below) looked at 23 non-active subjects who were randomly assigned to an active or placebo group. After exhaustive arm exercises, a relatively weak 350Gauss (35 mTesla) multipolar magnet (Bioflex) was applied around the elbow for just 45 minutes per day for 5 consecutive days. There were no noticeable differences in outcome measures between the two groups.

One could say, “of course there would be no difference”. The magnet used in the Reeser study was too weak AND should have been used all day in order to provide a therapeutic benefit.

Is there any difference in using the north or south pole of a magnet?

We often get asked the question… “Which side of the magnet do we apply, the north (positive) or south (negative) pole?”

Q magnets are multipolar magnets and for very good reasons both poles are placed facing the body. When quadrapolar magnets are used, all four poles face the body in what is a symmetrical field, much like the yin-yang symbol.

YinYangQMagnet

Magnet field therapy for pain relief – Radio 2UE Healthy Living

We have provided a transcript of the interview with some links to the supporting documents and quoted studies.

Introduction by host David Prior of 2UE:
People have been using magnets for a long time now, third century AD the Greeks were actually treating arthritis with magnets. Medieval doctors used magnets to treat gout, poisoning and also baldness, believe it or not. Today, magnets are popular for pain relief for shoe insoles, bracelets, head bands, belts and mattress pads. So, can magnets bring about better health doctor Ross? What is the research?

Guest:
OK, last week (link to last week’s show) I was mentioning that I have trialled magnets for pain relief, I’ve trialled the Scenar therapy and I’ve also trialled the Pain Master. All of which have given me enormous relief, which I think is a good thing. I don’t think you need the very rigid randomised controlled clinical trials that you might need for strong pharmaceutical agents that also have the potential for harm or for significant surgical procedures. Alex called up and said I shouldn’t be condoning or advising therapy that doesn’t have proper science. He said there was a Cochrane Review that said that magnets don’t help at all, that it’s basically just snake oil salesman stuff.

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